Obsessed with Car-Toons!

10 May, 2008

It appears that I’m heading full speed ahead to be obsessed with Car-Toons, or Chibi-Cars, or whatever you want to call them really! They are cute and real fun to look at!

For some years (…or decades?) I’ve been seeing these cute sketches cropping around and they always get my attention. In fact I could spend more time observing a good car-toon than a good normal car rendering! And I always wanted to do a car-toon sketch! Also recently I’ve watched “Cars”, the movie from Pixar and falled in love with it! It all happened really 3-4 weeks ago when I first saw Brian Knowlton’s (also known as R0tti on deviantart.com) fabulous line-art sketch of a Lamborghini Gallardo Spyder! I was hooked! Brian had put so much character and personality in to the car that it could almost speak back to you! Not to mention that it was so sweet to look at!

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Definition of the term “Vexel”

10 February, 2008

A lot of new people in illustration often ask what is “Vexel Art”.

The short answer for it is that it’s mixed discipline artwork; you can combine vector based artwork (paths, shapes, vector lines and polylines) with normal raster artwork (brushes etc). Whenever you combine these two elements, the derivative is called Vexel Art. Most of the time my artwork is vexel art, since I can get the best out the two (vector art and raster art) when combined. And as you can easily understand, vexel artwork can be achieved only with a computer :), it can include some traditional media elements in it, but the end result will be done on your digital friend πŸ™‚

Usually vexel ‘products’ are clean-cut illustrations, since you have all the line control of vectors and the color gradient freedom from raster! Comics in colour are usually vexel artwork, as well as the majority of conceptual automotive or industrial design renderings.

An interesting and more in-depth description of Vexel art can be found here, written by the superb vexel (automotive) artist dangerruss.


Photoshop: Converting Raster Images to Custom Shapes

5 February, 2008

One of the most useful tricks of our trade is the ability to convert within Photoshop a raster image to a custom monochromatic shape.
What’s the use of that? First of all, as you can understand, whenever you bring up the size of your shape, it never looses it’s “quality”, in other words it doesn’t pixelate like raster images do as you pump up their size.

The downside of that is that the shapes produced are monochromatic only; you cannot turn a full color image to a full color vector shape by doing the following procedure. Nevertheless it is a very useful technique that produces stylized monochrome graphics, mostly useful in applications where large scale printing is needed afterwards, eg. monochrome logos: you will be able to scale up to any size your logo without loosing on the image’s quality. Read the rest of this entry »


Photoshop: Brushes, Paths & Shapes

23 December, 2007

Here are a couple of excellent and extensive tutorials on 2 really hot subjects of the ol’ Photoshop:

Brushes Dynamics
Photoshop has an array of adjustable attributes to each and every brush. The tutorial above describes those attributes of the brushes and what happens when you change those dials πŸ™‚

Shapes, Paths and the Pen tool
To be honest with you, I’ve been working with Shapes and Paths for only one year now. Before that I was doing my masking using either the polygonal lasso tool, or the magic wand and on very rare occasions the freehand lasso tool, thinking that paths is just a trendy tool that only real pros use! Was I silly or what?

One afternoon last year, Read the rest of this entry »